The Librarian’s Cellar Book of the Week: Leonard and Hungry Paul by Rónán Hession

The core of ‘Leonard and Hungry Paul’ concerns the friendship between two men, both single, one recently bereaved, the other living with his parents as his sister’s upcoming wedding plans unfold. The supporting characters speak from the pages, they are so well developed, and the drama is so quiet and familiar, were it not for the beautiful writing from Hession, this novel might otherwise seem a little mundane in it’s depiction of everyday life. However, this novel is themed on human connection and kindness and is a gorgeous read. Clever, gentle prose concerning clever, gentle characters. No spoilers, but well into the second half, there is a wonderful conversation between Hungry Paul and his sister Grace that should be compulsive reading! It takes place in the bathroom as HP is cleaning his teeth, and his words spill out so gently, and with such wisdom and clarity, it took my breath away. Such a refreshing, unique novel. I loved it!

The Librarian’s Cellar Book of The Week: Inside Out by Demi Moore

I have always admired Demi Moore for her achievements, and was aware that her early life had not been easy. However, in ‘Inside Out’, Demi’s honesty is at times shocking and heart breaking. Behind the glamour, the fame and the money, she relates a very human story of vulnerability, strength, struggle, addiction, magnificent ups and devastating downs, but I never got a sense that her writing was coming from a place of bitterness. It is of course, her story, and therefore, her side of the story, and she is candid in her descriptions of her experiences of family relationships, as well as her much publicised marriages. I can only imagine that some parts, particularly those concerning her parents, were not easy to share. Many women, and men, of high achievement start from a rock-bottom place. Demi is a survivor, and a great talent. Fair play to her. A worthy read.

The Librarian’s Cellar Book of The Week: The Hiding Game by Louise Phillips

Heather Baxter is an attorney who by day, defends a young girl accused of killing an infant boy in her charge, and by night, is tormented as she tries to make sense of her mother’s unsolved murder, many years earlier. Through her journey of discovery, Heather uncovers several links between the two cases, often in terrible danger as she moves ever closer to a cruel and ruthless killer. A thoroughly enjoyable thriller combining exciting courtroom drama with unsettling secrets, mystery and intrigue!

The HIDING GAME is released on September 5th. Thanks to NetGalley and Hachette Books Ireland for the opportunity to read this ARC.

The Librarian’s Cellar Book of the Week: The View From the Cheap Seats by Neil Gaiman

There is something for everyone between the pages of this much quoted book. Passionate tributes to his favourite writers, some of them his very good friends. Entertaining essays, keynote speeches, personal experiences (a rather sobering piece from 2014: So Many Ways to Die in Syria) and throughout, praise for comic books, illustrators, artists and some lovely references to family. For readers of classic horror, there are tributes that ought to make you want to revisit the likes of Poe and Stoker. In his introduction to a 2004 edition of Poe’s Selected Poems and Tales, Gaiman suggests, ‘Read the poems aloud. Read the stories aloud. Feel the way the words work in your mouth, the way the syllables bounce and roll and drive and repeat, or almost repeat’. And on Stoker’s Dracula, in an introduction to an annotated 2008 version by Leslie S. Klinger, Gaiman writes that ‘First you read it casually, and then, once you’ve put it away, you might find yourself, almost against your will, wondering about the things in the crevices of the novel, things hinted at, things implied.’ On writing, take this insightful thought from his introduction to a 2008 edition of James Thurber’s The 13 Clocks, ‘When I was a young writer, I liked to imagine that I was paying someone for every word I wrote, rather than being paid for it; it was a fine way to discipline myself only to use the words I needed.’ A mini masterclass right there! The View from the Cheap Seats in a wonderful gem, filled with perceptive thoughts and inspiration. Don’t pass it by!

 

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Caroline E Farrell is a writer, filmmaker and blogger. She is the author of the novel, LADY BETH and has written and directed the short film FRAMED (2018). She has also written and co-produced the short films IN RIBBONS (2015) and ADAM (2013).

The Librarian’s Cellar Book of The Week: Apple of My Eye by Claire Allan

Claire Allan’s latest novel is a quick and compelling read – for all the twisted reasons that you can imagine. Eli is a nurse working in a hospice. She is expecting her first child, feeling unwell and filled with doubts about her ability to love and care for her new baby. However, she has great support from work colleagues, a loving husband, and a very caring mother, so what could possibly go wrong? Everything, it seems as she begins to receive mysterious messages hinting that Martin, her husband, may be cheating on her. In her vulnerable state, and despite his vehement denials of any wrong-doing, Eli begins to doubt Martin… no spoilers here, but the sinister element of gaslighting takes this thriller to a chilling conclusion.

 

Published by Avon | 2019

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Caroline E Farrell is a writer, filmmaker and blogger. She is the author of the novel, LADY BETH and has written and directed the short film FRAMED (2018). She has also written and co-produced the short films IN RIBBONS (2015) and ADAM (2013).

 

The Librarian’s Cellar TBR Battle: November Reads

The ‘To Be Read’ battle continues! The goal I set for myself was to read 20 titles between September and December. So far, I have read 12 books , see September Reads HERE and October Reads HERE

So, maybe I won’t reach my original target, but I am enjoying the challenge anyway, and making time to read in a busy day is the best thing there is, so I’m winning! Here are four books I’ve enjoyed this November.

Good Samaritans by [Carver, Will]

Good Samaritans by Will Carver is a nasty book! A compelling, sharply written, nasty book! One crossed wire, three dead bodies and six bottles of bleach! No spoilers, but you get the picture? Carver has created an ensemble of sharply observed, three-dimensional characters and a cracking good story of twisted desires – and the evil that festers while in the grip of those desires. I can see the movie rising from the pages. Not one for the squeamish though!

 

When Your Eyes Close: A psychological thriller unlike anything you’ve read before! by [Farrelly, Tanya]

When Your Eyes Close by Tanya Farrelly has an unusual premise, which could have been quite difficult to execute (excuse the pun!). However, the author has managed to do just that. The story weaves around Nick Drake, a troubled alcoholic, now seriously ill, and in search of the clarity he needs to get his life back on track. Through the unlikely catalyst of Hypnotism, Nick’s journey will uncover long-buried secrets, twisted lies, and will lead to the eventual unmasking of an unlikely murderer.

 

In Pieces by Sally Field is both honest and courageous. Field conveys a childhood that was far from perfect with a candid flow that never leans into self-pity or moroseness. The book took seven years to write, with highlights from her acting career and her love affairs, but the most impressive element of this memoir for me is the deep love she holds for her mother and family that permeates every page.

 

The Broken Girls by Simone St. James is a riveting read, a chilling suspense thriller that encompasses the supernatural and a good old-fashioned tale of a journalist with attitude, still haunted by her sister’s death 20 years earlier. The story moves back and forth between past and present, and features Idlewood Hall, a now derelict building that was once a school for girls – girls that were trouble-makers, unwanted, or just too smart for their own good in an era that did not protect nor cherish them. A shocking discovery when a new and mysterious owner of Idlewood Hall begins renovations, sets in motion a riveting, twisting mystery that will unearth some painful truths.

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Caroline E. Farrell is a writer and filmmaker. Her novel, LADY BETH was awarded BEST NOVEL by the Carousel Aware Prize in 2017. She has also written and directed the short film, FRAMED (2018) currently on the festival circuit, and has written and co-produced the award-winning IN RIBBONS (2015) and ADAM (2013). She is currently working on her latest novel. 

 

The Librarian’s Cellar: Great Reads – Luisne An Chleite

I received this beautifully produced anthology as a gift, and just had to share it here.

Filled with creative input from writers and artists living in Kildare, the book is a revelation of poetry, prose, paintings and drawings from a very talented collective. For the Gaelgoirs, there are also some lovely Irish language pieces, and what a fabulous title Luisne an ChleiteInspiration of the Quill. Well done to the Wordsmiths Creative Writing Group on the creation and publication of such a gorgeous book, and kudos to Celine Broughal (Writer and Librarian!) and to the library service for supporting such a lovely project.